Leunig on the Literature of You and Me

The Literature of You and Me by Michael Leunig from his Michael Leunig Appreciation Page

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Michael-Leunig-Appreciation-Page/175074566012104

leunigI  will now look at my shopping lists with fresh eyes.  How lucky we are to be able to communicate with others via the written word and even to communicate with ourselves in the same way.

You find the most important writings in the most unusual places.So thank you Michael Leunig.

Journey to the Stone Country – Alex Miller and ideas on Conservation

Plenty has been written about the storyline of Journey to the Stone Country.  We have a  fortyish woman who was raised on an outback Queensland station and an aboriginal man who grew up in the same area.  They meet  and when working together visit a long deserted, decaying station house

The house was left with its contents intact so we are given an understanding of what the life was like when the occupants were alive.  My interest was suddenly sparked when the question was raised about the rightness or otherwise of preserving or conserving objects from the past. exactly as they were found.

So imagine standing in the dining room of a fully furnished house whose air has not been disturbed by a human for a long while  Can you feel the previous dwellers.?  Do you feel comfortable or is there a shiver down your spine ? Do you feel that you are intruding on something private ?

Preserve 1One thing we should all treasure is our privacy. With social media this is becoming something that people have less and less regard for. We can have our discussions in our blogs but surely we all draw the line at just how much about ourselves we will reveal.  So if we preserve these objects from the past are we intruding on the privacy of the owners.

Preserve 2When we do conserve the past does that intangible atmosphere disappear ?

Preserve 3Alex Miller gives a very convincing argument which carries you along while you are reading.  In this case it was a substantial house which was the object in question. But how often when driving out in the country have you seen a clump of daffodils just inside the paddock fence, or a lone fruit tree in a most unlikely place and you realise that once there was probably a hut or home on that site

I have done a fair amount of family history research over the years and I have come across documents that have made me mentally apologize to the people for having intruded on their privacy, As far as I am concerned they will remain private.

But on the other hand look at this hut.  It is tucked away in a back yard in Castlemaine, Victoria, and you can see it by driving up the side lane.  Such a pretty little hut, or should I call it a cottage.  My McDonald great-grandparents lived  in this cottage in 1861-2 and had a couple of children there.

CottageCastlemaineI can use my imagination to try and re-create the lifestyle of Jane and Robert.  Would I have different emotions if the cottage had been allowed to fall into disrepair ? Would I feel their ghosts beside me ?  I am pleased that someone has taken the trouble to keep the cottage painted and in good repair.

Alex Miller would say that we have kept the fabric but lost the spirit.

December – From the Libraries – Nesbo, Galbraith, Rankin, Mankell, Hornby and Miller

Some months are good for reading and some aren’t. When you’re enjoying a book you can find plenty of time for reading but if the pages are dragging then daily reading time dwindles. December was a good month and here are my reactions   You can find out more about the stories elsewhere in WordPress blogs, written by people who specialize in doing that.

Police by Jo Nesbo

I was just finishing this book at the beginning of the month.. You either like crime novels or you don’t.  You either like translations of Scandivian crime novels or you don’t.  I do, and this book was no exception. And a lot depends on the translator to produce a fluid translation in the new language. This was the tenth book in the Harry Hole series and didn’t disappoint.  I’ve been interested to note that  Nesbo is now working on a couple of new novels under the nom-de-plume of  Tom Johansen.

Cuckoo Calling by Robert Galbraith aka J.K.Rowling

I go to the library to collect books that I have decided I want to read but I always have a quick look at the Returned Books Shelf.  You never know what you might find there.  On one such day Cuckoo Calling was displayed prominently.  Now I am full of admiration for J.K.Rowling for her ability to write books that children want to read.  But I found her first adult novel, Casual Vacancy, very disappointing and had decided never again !  Famous last words. There it was, sitting on the shelf mocking me, Cuckoo Calling, so down it came.  And the inevitable happened, I just loved it.

That wasn’t my reaction in the first three pages where she set up the crime which is going to need solving.  My prejudices were there and I was muttering words like Adjective Junkie, and, Any High School kid could do better than that. Bees humming AND buzzing in the same sentence,  Not the bees that I know.   But once she starts the real story she is off and running, a real story-teller.

There is the suitably dishevelled, highly intelligent but damaged detective, struggling to make a living.  He is assisted by a delightful, resourceful and tactful Secretary who he gradually comes to realize that he couldn’t do without. (I’ve already cast the delightful Scottish actress Kelly McDonald in the role of the Secretary ! )  It sounds familiar, doesn’t it and I wonder if Rowling had a smile on her face some of the time while writing.

The end is such that further stories could be written.   How they would fare I do not know as even though I enjoyed the books the characters don’t have the depth, that you find in a Henning Mankell or Jo Nesbo book,  which you need for a lengthy series.

Knots and Crosses by Ian Rankin

Knots and Crosses is another  random choice book, displayed front and centre on the Returned Book shelf,  just waiting to be taken home for a visit.  Over the years I have seen TV interpretations of the Rebus series.  I remember enjoying the series when John Hannah played Rebus but when a different actor took over the role they became just another cop show of no particular interest, I even read a couple of the novels.  But that is all in the past and the details were fading from the memory  so I was a bit amazed when I found myself enjoying Ian Rankin’s first novel far more than I expected to.  Rankin’s words and my imagination renewed my interest in  the characters I remember seeing  on the small screen. Further interest came from filling in the earlier life of Rebus.

The Pyramid by Henning Mankell

This book got renewed twice at the library before I finished reading it. This was possible as it is a series of five  shorter Kurt Wallander mysteries which progress through his life from his beginnings as a detective, through his marriage, fatherhood and  the breakup of his marriage. But it wasn’t written until eight of the main Wallander mysteries had been written and helped to fill in the back story.

As well as wallowing in crime stories there were a couple of light pieces from the library on my mini ipad, used for late night or coffee shop reading.

How to be Good by Nick Hornby – a bit of fluff

Lovesong by Alex Miller  With an inter-country marriage how do you cope with the family ties pulling in different directions.

One thing I don’t lack is a choice of bookmarks for each of my reads.

Bookmarks 2

Get Well Message for an Old Friend

 TentCaravan  With Lyn and Peter on a ride

Des. Peter, Lyn

In caravan

Once upon a time there were two young couples who among other things used to go camping together.Now time has passed and one of the older ladies wanted to write to one of the older men to send him a few visual memories, to wish him well with his visit to hospital and hopefully put a smile on his face.  This is what she wrote.

Dear Friend,

! was sorry to hear that you are having a spell in hospital and hope that you make rapid progress and get home soon.

I was wondering if you remember anything about Set Theory, in particular the Intersection of Sets.

A ∩ B = ( x :  x Є A  ʌ  x Є B )

So if we say that

A represents the list of possible ailments for a man, and

B represents the list of possible ailments for a woman

Then

1.  I am quite happy to empathize with you if your present trouble lies in the Intersection Set Aas it  would be quite possible for me to have the same  problem as you

2.  I reserve the right to smirk whenever your ailment is such that A ∩ B = ф , i.e. your ailment doesn’t fall in the intersection set and there is no way in the world that I could possibly get that problem.

3. But I give you permission to smirk, gloat, snigger, grin, jeer, leer  and generally poke fun at my distress in the nicest possible way if any ailment that I should suffer from  also doesn’t lie in the intersection set and that there is no way that you could acquire that problem.

So….. whether your ailments lie in A ∩ B  or if A ∩ B = ф

                         GET WELL SOON.

 

The Rights of the Reader

For those of you who don’t read The Matilda Project , a fascinating stroll through the bookshops of London, today she included Daniel Pennac’s “Rights of the Reader” which are -

1. The right not to read

2. The right to skip pages

3. The right not to finish a book

4. The right to re-read

5. The right to read whatever you want

6. The right to ‘Bovarysme’ (the error of identifying too much with the book)

7. The right to read wherever you want

8. The right to dip in and out

9. The right to read out loud

10. The right to silence!

That makes me feel so good.  My reading is MY reading and doesn’t have to be approved by anyone else.

There was another piece of advice on reading which I heard a few years ago.  It had to do with how far you should perservere with a book before discarding it. The rule was to take your age in years away from 100.  This gives you  the number of pages you need to read before deciding this book is not for you. So the older you get the less time you have to waste on uninteresting books while when younger it encourages you to continue reading in the hope of broadening your reading experiences.

I’m not going to have that trouble with the book that I’m reading at the moment, Normally our library lets us have books for four weeks but with new books the time is restricted to two weeks. So I only have two weeks to read the 700 pages of 1914, The Year the World Ended, by Paul Ham. There is no way I will finish it in time but it is very interesting reading, going back many  years to talk about the many threads which led to this war.

1914 paul ham

1 book + 1 bread knife = 2 books

half a book 5This is my favorite 3-6 pm radio program,  Always entertaining and informative.

Today Raf came out with the statement that he had become tired of trying to read The Luminaries in bed because of its size.  So he got up the next morning, took the bread knife and cut it in half to make  two manageable books.  Later he was to stick them back together with gaffer tape.

half a bookUnfortunately for me I was reading, or trying to read, a library copy, so couldn’t follow his example.  I was allowed the book for two weeks and could only read it by sitting at a table holding the book open with two hands, which doesn’t put you in a receptive frame of mind for reading.  To me the book would have been more enjoyable if half the words had also been removed.  Somewhere in there is quite an interesting story lost in the a world of cumbersome writing as well as the unwieldy physical size.

I was only hald way through the book when library return day arrived and I had no intention of mentioning it untl this delightrful segment from Raf today. I don’t know whether or not he enjoyed the book but he got people talking about the fattest books they’ve ever read and that was fun.

half a book 4half a book 2half a book 3

At the moment the fattest books on my bookshelf are the Complete Works of Shakespeare and  the Complete Plays of Bernard Shaw, but I don’t think I would want to read those in bed.

Seriously though, being comfortable is all part of the reading experience, the pleasure of immersing yourself in a good story.  And part of the pleasure is the sheer feel, smell and appearance of the book,  But there’s always time for having a bit of fun with a book too, like cutting it down to size !

Harvest by Jim Crace

In a nutshell , not bad !  It didn’t grab me to begin with, but after a while I found myself quite absorbed by the story, slowly being carried along by the events in a small English village

HarvestIt is set at a time when the enclosure of  land was becoming prevalent, possibly late C16th  Unfenced fields for crops provided good work for the villagers ,  But replacing crops with the more lucrative sheep required both fencing the fields and reducing the number of workers.

The story takes place within one week and is narrated by a villager, a widower who is not quite a villager as he came to the community after he became an adult. Through his marriage to a local girl he is accepted in good times but in times of trouble he doesn’t necessarily have  the full trust he deserves.

When strangers arrive in the village, a party on horseback  to the manor house and  some wanderers who camp on the outskirts  of the village, the disintegration of the village is set on its way.  In a matter of a few days a stable, balanced community  falls apart.

It reminded me of  Geraldine Brooks’ “Year of Wonders” but in that case a village turned in on itself and cut itself off from the world.  In this story  the villagers deserted their homes to spread out into the world. Two different village reactions and two  quite different styles of writing,  but both enjoyable

One thing I did appreciate with this book was the author’s empathy with the countryside of the village. I don’t think even the best of researchers could give you that  feeling of being at one with the living land. These days there is such separation between  our food, clothing, shelter, water, warmth. and their origins.

The basic small town story still has it’s equivalent today with the closure of  businesses, particularly in small towns. Lords of the Manor have been replaced with politicians and big business. Replace the fields with offshore processing, disregarding the human cost.

But to return to Jim Crace,  on page 232 when walking  in the rain as dusk takes hold and the sky blackens he writes —–
This downpour has not got  the force to last, but for the moment it takes hold. The clouds carry too much weight before they reached this place. I can almost hear them sigh with relief as they let go their load.

In future I’ll be listening for the sighs.