Casual Vacancy by J.K.Rowling

Rowling among the tree tops

Usually I don’t hesitate to discard a book if I’m not enjoying it so why haven’t I discarded Casual Vacancy by J.K.Rowling.  Perhaps it’s because I don’t trust my own judgement.  After all, think of  the number of books she has sold and think of my lack of training in writing and the appreciation of  literature .

So why has it got to the point where I still HAVE to read fifty pages a day if I’m to get it back to the library in time, apart from the fact that I find her writing very dull. What instinct prevented me from buying it for myself in the first place? There’s nothing wrong with the storyline.  There is a vacancy.  That’s a common happening in the real world and leaves plenty of room for the imagination to work.  But it’s an adult vacancy.  So why all this pre-occupation with the children of the village? To me they are mostly irrelevant to the filling of the vacancy which I thought was the purpose of the story.

I’m half way through the book and I am still having trouble distinguishing the characters.  They are still shapeless, faceless people.  Probably the children are the easiest.   Krystal, Fats and Andrew, well I think I’d know them if I met them in the street !  But so far the adults blend together.  I would probably have to start again to try and sort them out but I shouldn’t have to do that to enjoy the book. Perhaps I’ll read this book again some time in the future and thoroughly enjoy it, but I have doubts about that.

At least I can pick nice places to sit and read it, this time in the tree-tops with their roots down on the river bank.

Looking out through the glass